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World War I sugar substitutes no sacrifice today

The United States has always had a major sweet tooth. Americans today consume 77 pounds of sugar per person every year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and during World War I Americans ate more sugar than anyone else in the world. So being told to give it up or cut it back was seen …

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Eating nose to tail meant more meat for Europe in WWI

  Eating nose to tail was more patriotic than trendy during World War I. Because of the dramatic food shortages in Europe, Americans were encouraged to eat “alternate” meats (something other than beef) and all parts of the animal. One way to reduce beef consumption, according to the authors of “Win the War in the Kitchen,” was …

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Learning to go without meat and wheat in WWI

World War I cookbooks indicate most Americans at the time thought protein could only be obtained from red meat, and that without it their health would suffer.  And now, they were being asked to go without meat. Cookbooks written for wartime use tried to re-educate the public. “Although most persons believe that protein can only be obtained …

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WWI food shortages changed American eating habits

Meatless Monday are nothing new. The same term was used during World War I to encourage Americans to eat non-meat proteins in response to food shortages in Europe. Red meat was considered the most desirable animal protein. Home economists put together cookbooks with meat alternatives such as milk, cheese, eggs, fish, legumes and nuts. (Poultry …

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World War I rallying cry: Food will win the war

World War I touched Americans in their home kitchens well before the U.S. entered the war. In response to food shortages in Europe, the U.S. government made a huge effort to conserve food and send much-needed supplies to Europe. When the Americans joined the conflict in 1917, food was made a central issue. That year, President Woodrow …

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