Features RSS feed for this section

Chop Talk: Patti Jackson interprets Mid-Atlantic cuisine

At a small restaurant in Williamsburg, chef Patti Jackson is showcasing foods from an often underrepresented area of the country: the Mid-Atlantic. Jackson offers food “from Baltimore to Buffalo” at Delaware and Hudson, and she’s serving more than just crab cakes and pretzels – although she does offer versions of both classics. Since the restaurant opened in …

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Pawpaws: Starting to remember America’s forgotten fruit

The other night, under cover of dark, I finally got my pawpaw delivery. A merchant at my local farmers market in Washington, D.C. brought me a box of pawpaws he got in Pennsylvania. “The problem with these paw paws,” he said, “is that the trees belong to the sister of the guy I get them …

Read full story · Comments { 1 }

What am I, chopped herring?

I grew up in such an assimilated Midwestern Jewish family that I had hardly heard of chopped liver let alone chopped herring. My grandparents and most of their many siblings were born in Minnesota, unusual for Jews of that generation. But my Great Aunt Debbie – who lived most her life in the land of …

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Jacques Pepin slow but still steady

He doesn’t swallow insects or tell anyone they’ve been “chopped,” and as far as we know, he’s never yelled “Bam!” But Jacques Pepin has been a force on American food television for longer than many viewers have been alive. Pepin, who turns 80 next year, steps down from his longtime perch on public television with …

Read full story · Comments { 12 }

American Food Roots wins 2 food journalism awards

American Food Roots has won two awards from the Association of Food Journalists. AFR took second place in the Association’s 2014 “Best Food Blog” category. The competition was stiff. First place went to Mother Jones. The Charleston Post and Courier was awarded third. AFR also took second place for “Best non-newspaper food feature” with our …

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Confessions of a clam killer

    “No, don’t die!” I found myself yelling at the bowl in my sink. I had just covered about 3 dozen steamer clams with water, and when I added a small bit of salt and cornmeal, which I’d been told would help them spit their grit, a sort of gurgle came from the water. …

Read full story · Comments { 2 }

Lebanese cooking workshop serves both food and hospitality

The Lebanese consider it an honor to have guests in their home. Jeanette Chawki, therefore, wants to make her students comfortable as much as she wants to share her passion for the cooking of her homeland. Her position as an instructor for League of Kitchens, a New York culinary program through which immigrants teach intimate …

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Early-American Jews brought elements of Mediterranean diet

When I was in graduate school researching newspapers from the 1780s and ’90s, I was surprised to find Philadelphia merchants advertising olive oil, capers and anchovies. Who ate these foods, I wondered, and what did they make with them? These and other Mediterranean foods, I learned, were Jewish contributions to American cuisine. The earliest Jews …

Read full story · Comments { 1 }

America’s land-water-food history at Smithsonian’s Food in the Garden series

Two centuries of connections between land, water and food in the U.S. will be explored on Thursday nights in September at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Gardens. Food in the Garden offers panel discussions, demonstrations, and food and drink in the museum’s Victory Garden. The museum is located at 14th Street …

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Puerto Rican tembleque: More than one way to crack a coconut

“I can order one for you,” the butcher says in Spanish when I ask if he knows where I can get a machete. “No, that’s all right,” I reply, feeling awkward about placing a machete order, “but do you know of a place in the neighborhood where I can get one,” I ask. “Well, there’s …

Read full story · Comments { 1 }