January, 2013

Peanut butter stirring made easy

Peanut butter was invented in the 1890s, but it took another 100 years to figure out how to stir it. You know what we’re talking about. Digging a knife into the bottom of the jar. Trying to mix the peanut sludge with the ¼ inch of oil on top. Inevitably splashing it all over your hand, …

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Cioppino, pit beef square off at Super Bowl dinner

In each calendar year, I give myself a few days to eat with wanton disregard for my personal health. Thanksgiving is one of those days. The day we take the kids to the state fair is another. But, my favorite day of pure gluttony is Super Bowl Sunday. In what has become a tradition in …

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Eddie Huang tells American story through his own lens

  Eddie Huang does not want to be a poster boy for the American Dream. The 30-year-old food celebrity definitely has the rags-to-riches resume. Born in the Washington, D.C., suburbs to Taiwanese immigrants, Huang grew up in his family’s furniture stores and then in their Orlando, Fla., restaurants. He failed. A lot. He failed at …

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Cassoulet gives Super Bowl a French twist

Although it is probably against the law this time of year, I know almost nothing about football. Worse, I don’t care. I have a friend similarly inclined. So that our families and friends don’t shun us, we transfer the zealous enthusiasm that should go into the Super Bowl to the Super Bowl meal. We tried …

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Schmaltz is the secret to delicious chopped liver

Every Friday night Deb Samuels and her siblings would pile into the car for the trip to her grandmother’s house for Shabbat dinner. Because her family was of Eastern European extraction, the meal was often roast chicken and matzo ball soup and other homey comforts. But no matter what the main course, the meal always …

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Whoopie_pie_with_dusting_of_confectioner's_sugar

The Weekly List: State food trivia

  Lots of people know that Pennsylvania is famous for pretzels and who doesn’t associate New York with bagels? But where did pancake mix come from? What about Moon Pies? And which states might challenge each other to a whoopie pie smackdown? A little culinary excavation reveals state secrets. Arizona The first barrel of tequila …

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N.J. restaurateur champions Latin American cooking

While “Gran Cocina Latina” celebrates great Latin cooking in countries throughout this hemisphere, the cookbook’s inclusive vision “is very American,” author Maricel E. Presilla says. “The fact is, we live in a country that’s actually Latin American, too. This book couldn’t have been written anywhere else,” Presilla explains. “The Latin American presence – you’re not …

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Hot cereal may be more than you think

Hot cereal has gone beyond oatmeal. Even oatmeal has gone beyond oatmeal. Steel-cut oats are blended with buttermilk, dried fruits, nuts and spices. Oatmeal can be cooked overnight in a slow cooker so it’s there for you in the morning. Or you can bake oatmeal at night and reheat it for breakfast. Some people even …

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Don’t stir the pilaf

“We do eat a lot of pilaf,” says Michelle Andonian of her Armenian culinary heritage. The traditional simple dish of rice mixed with egg noodles is a staple of Sunday dinner in many Armenian-American homes, where it is served alongside roast chicken. There are variations, of course—with bulgur in place of rice, with pine nuts …

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Inauguration toasts: favorite presidential drinks

Every four years, Americans choose beverages with which to either toast the new administration or drown their sorrows. Derek Brown, owner of the Passenger Bar and the Columbia Room in Washington, D.C., is making drinks for his second Obama inauguration this year. While he can’t divulge what the current president will be drinking, he’s happy …

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