World War I sugar substitutes no sacrifice today

The United States has always had a major sweet tooth. Americans today consume 77 pounds of sugar per person every year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and during World War I Americans ate more sugar than anyone else in the world. So being told to give it up or cut it back was seen …

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Eating nose to tail meant more meat for Europe in WWI

  Eating nose to tail was more patriotic than trendy during World War I. Because of the dramatic food shortages in Europe, Americans were encouraged to eat “alternate” meats (something other than beef) and all parts of the animal. One way to reduce beef consumption, according to the authors of “Win the War in the Kitchen,” was …

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Reveillon: Christmas in New Orleans, of course, is a party

Being a (severely) backslidden Southern Baptist, the idea of a midnight mass is foreign to me. After all, nothing good happens after midnight, right? But a reveillon dinner might be enough for me to find religion again. Reveillon, a New Orleans tradition, began in the 1800s as a meal that was eaten in the wee …

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Cuccidati means Christmas in Sicilian

When Wayne Baden was growing up his grandmother made a mysterious cookie every Christmas. Around November, she would open all the windows and roll the buttery dough in the freezing cold kitchen, working fast so it wouldn’t melt. The fig-stuffed treats were covered in “jolly” sprinkles, Baden remembered, but he never knew the name of …

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